July 29, 2014

Love the Free, Vol. II mixtape by Kitty Cash [self-released]

Kitty Cash, most known as the DJ for Kilo Kish,  recently dropped her second edition of her compilation tape, Love the Free. The debut made ripples, spreading the gooey R&B-tinged hip-hop to those who craved it — and we all know that sound is serving up the sweet spot for quite a lot of people. The track list for the follow-up covers a solid, diverse list: Rome Fortune, Yuna, a Hyetal remix of Empress Of, SZA, Dev Hynes, Wet, and of course Kilo Kish. Stream the mix-form of the tape above.

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Filed under: Hip Hop R&B Pop Kitty Cash 
July 29, 2014

"Maison Margiela" by Future [Freebandz]

This is more of what I wanted more from Honest. But hey, he applies that same energy to his verse in “My Momma,” which is my favorite rap verse from this year so far. It was time to get serious, I understand, but seeing him stunt is equally rewarding.

(And what do you know, Metro Boomin’ also produced this in collaboration with DJ Spinz!)

July 29, 2014

"Chanel Vintage" by Future (ft. Young Thug) [self-released]

What the fuck, Future? How can you go so hard here? I really wish he went this berserk on Honest, which the lack of the experimentalist I love was a disappointment from the get go, but at the same I know why he didn’t. So let’s, then, consider Honest as a stamp of “let me show all y’all I can rock all this at the flick of my wrist”-type of show-and-prove and everything after is him clearly going beyond the bar he set (re-set?). His digressions, man. I’m feeling the chills from his delivery all over again.

When I reviewed Honest, Young Thug naturally loomed over in my head. Thugger’s been rolling with the twitch-y, unhinged, lean-influenced flow of Future and his ilk and twisting it into another dimension. His “Stoner” runs laps around Honest, in my opinion, but I’m more than stoked how Future bumps head with, if not snatches his spot from Thug. Of course, that’s not to say Thug doesn’t give it his all here; he whips his voice more intense than I’ve heard in the past few months.

This also  assures me about how his just-OK yet boldly out-there performances he’s been dropping left and right. The best thing he has out right now is his recent collaboration with Metro Boomin’, “Treasure,” who also produces this cut. His Brick Squad releases, both The Purple Album and 1017 Thug 2, is interesting enough to keep the buzz rolling but I see him more using that venture to really see where his possibilities and limitations are at — which is how the mixtape format should be cleverly used!

Thugger’s storing his energy right now. When it comes to time for real bat, he’s got the skills already stacked in him. I can’t wait for someone to hand him that official spot for him to break out what he has learned. And Future already showed a preview of what he’s capable of.

July 29, 2014

July 29, 2014

July 28, 2014
The Minimal Yet Bold Art of Sophie
The elusive candy-coated producer Sophie released a new single today called “Lemonade.” As you may have predicted if you previously followed his viral single, “Bipp,” from last year, that thing is a delightful oddball of squeaky, abrupt bass, if not more. (You can preview a minute-long clip of it here.) Sure, I could gush about that in detail, and I’d be glad to, but I want to talk about something else instead. And that’s the artwork used in Sophie’s latest and also his past one for the “Bipp / Elle” 12”.
The art used for “Bipp" resembled half-Fruit by the Foot strip and half-fantasy water slide. You could make a good argument for either being that “Bipp” musically embodied both the dangerous sugar highs and the exuberance of a sliding down a huge water slide when you’re a kid — Maybe those two happening at the same time?
For “Lemonade,” shown above, the art is clear and literal, nevertheless colorful and constructed beyond the laws of the universe; the thing is floating in solitude and the sharp spiral loop makes you question its engineering whether it’s actually safe in reality. But the producer’s tracks defy the traditional rules of dance music and his synths often lean towards a threatening levels of distortion, so it’s an apt configuration either way.
I don’t know if it’s just my experiences at my local water park since I was a kid, but I associate water slides with bold primary colors, kinda like Sophie’s. If that color palette is not what you imagine, then picture a McDonald’s PlayPlace and its ball pit, basically a pool of exciting colors. In a way, the rush of youth and it’s dumb-fun energy is easily connected with primary colors — those water slides, the ball pit, the classic eight-set Crayola crayon boxes, if you wanna go further. It’s a similar take as found in Hudson Mohawke’s latest artwork for his new, equally-brash single “Chimes,” and in his case he riffed on the bright colors often used for pool floats.
Of course the clear difference between Sophie and Hudson Mohawke’s art is that the latter’s incredibly busy to the point of crude, and the former is meticulously minimal. The split in the extremes of busyness splits their music, too.
Despite the fact the two go in your face with loud sounds, they render it almost opposite of each other. While Hud Mo continuous stacks and covers his playing field, Sophie turns up the concentrate on one single component, mostly the corrosive synths. His production is incredibly stripped as well. Usually nothing is left in the space between the whirring bass and his dented synths. Hud Mo’s often sound like a sleek collage or a symmetric stack of glass; Sophie’s feel exactly like its covers — a lone buzzing, radiant ball bouncing around in a vast, empty room.
Sophie’s stripped music is given a meticulous amount of attention, and it’s exciting to find that the representing art is equally thought out. It’s perfectly Sophie from the colors, shape and the implied spirit. The theme has been a continuous one, though he has released only two official singles so far. I don’t expect him to strictly churn out water park-themed art, but hopefully the art continues to embody the brilliant music behind it as defining as it does now.

The Minimal Yet Bold Art of Sophie

The elusive candy-coated producer Sophie released a new single today called “Lemonade.” As you may have predicted if you previously followed his viral single, “Bipp,” from last year, that thing is a delightful oddball of squeaky, abrupt bass, if not more. (You can preview a minute-long clip of it here.) Sure, I could gush about that in detail, and I’d be glad to, but I want to talk about something else instead. And that’s the artwork used in Sophie’s latest and also his past one for the “Bipp / Elle” 12”.

The art used for “Bipp" resembled half-Fruit by the Foot strip and half-fantasy water slide. You could make a good argument for either being that “Bipp” musically embodied both the dangerous sugar highs and the exuberance of a sliding down a huge water slide when you’re a kid — Maybe those two happening at the same time?

For “Lemonade,” shown above, the art is clear and literal, nevertheless colorful and constructed beyond the laws of the universe; the thing is floating in solitude and the sharp spiral loop makes you question its engineering whether it’s actually safe in reality. But the producer’s tracks defy the traditional rules of dance music and his synths often lean towards a threatening levels of distortion, so it’s an apt configuration either way.

I don’t know if it’s just my experiences at my local water park since I was a kid, but I associate water slides with bold primary colors, kinda like Sophie’s. If that color palette is not what you imagine, then picture a McDonald’s PlayPlace and its ball pit, basically a pool of exciting colors. In a way, the rush of youth and it’s dumb-fun energy is easily connected with primary colors — those water slides, the ball pit, the classic eight-set Crayola crayon boxes, if you wanna go further. It’s a similar take as found in Hudson Mohawke’s latest artwork for his new, equally-brash single “Chimes,” and in his case he riffed on the bright colors often used for pool floats.

Of course the clear difference between Sophie and Hudson Mohawke’s art is that the latter’s incredibly busy to the point of crude, and the former is meticulously minimal. The split in the extremes of busyness splits their music, too.

Despite the fact the two go in your face with loud sounds, they render it almost opposite of each other. While Hud Mo continuous stacks and covers his playing field, Sophie turns up the concentrate on one single component, mostly the corrosive synths. His production is incredibly stripped as well. Usually nothing is left in the space between the whirring bass and his dented synths. Hud Mo’s often sound like a sleek collage or a symmetric stack of glass; Sophie’s feel exactly like its covers — a lone buzzing, radiant ball bouncing around in a vast, empty room.

Sophie’s stripped music is given a meticulous amount of attention, and it’s exciting to find that the representing art is equally thought out. It’s perfectly Sophie from the colors, shape and the implied spirit. The theme has been a continuous one, though he has released only two official singles so far. I don’t expect him to strictly churn out water park-themed art, but hopefully the art continues to embody the brilliant music behind it as defining as it does now.

July 27, 2014
Well, here’s another good collection of songs with guitars about love, not getting love, and all that good tear-jerking stuff. You can listen on the band’s Bandcamp page. And I recommend you all should.

Well, here’s another good collection of songs with guitars about love, not getting love, and all that good tear-jerking stuff. You can listen on the band’s Bandcamp page. And I recommend you all should.

July 27, 2014

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Filed under: Cakes da Killa 
July 27, 2014

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Filed under: Huerco S Proibito 
July 26, 2014

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Filed under: Jenny Lewis